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Do Something


Since 2007, Sprint and the Sprint Foundation, have provided over $700,000 in support to Do Something Inc. In 2008, the Sprint Foundation provided funding for a youth volunteerism program called Do Something Now. DoSomething.org is one of the largest organizations in the U.S. that helps young people support causes they care about. A driving force in creating a culture of volunteerism, DoSomething.org is on track to activate five million young people by 2015. By leveraging the web, television, mobile, and pop culture, DoSomething.org inspires, empowers and celebrates a generation of doers: teenagers who recognize the need to do something, believe in their ability to get it done, and then take action.

Do Something offers a database of volunteer opportunities, specifically for young people, sorted by zip code so they can find a volunteering option in their community. Youth set up volunteer preferences and when an opportunity that fits their needs is found, it is pushed to their cell phone via sms or email.

In 2010, the Sprint Foundation expanded its relationship with Do Something by providing grant support of the Thumb Wars program. With car crashes being the leading killer of teens in the U.S., DoSomething.org and Sprint, through the Sprint Foundation, launched a campaign In April 2010 to combat this growing issue. "ThumbWars: Teens vs. Texting & Driving," empowers teens to join the fight, get their friends involved, and report back on how they're taking a stand against texting and driving. The campaign ran through the summer, when teens could visit ThumbWars.org and learn how to increase awareness about this important issue. On the site, teens could also order "thumb socks," to prevent them from texting and driving, and enter a bumper sticker design contest to spread further awareness. A Public Service Announcements (PSA) was created that featured funny men Joel McHale and Ken Jeong, co-stars from NBC's hit series "Community", where they start a thumb war and encourage teens to join the fight against texting and driving. In 2012, Sprint launched Thumb Wars 2.0 with celebrity spokesperson — Harry Shum, Jr., who plays Mike Chang on TV's "Glee." 60,000 pairs of "thumb socks" were mailed out to teens that helped spread the message about the dangers of texting and driving and they were entered to win a $10,000 college scholarship. You can view the PSA and learn more about this program at ThumbWars.org.

The Thumb Wars program continues an effort Sprint started in 2005 called Focus on Driving — a program with educators and law enforcement to educate young drivers on the importance of attentive driving. For more information on Sprint's Focus on Driving efforts, visit sprint.com/focusondriving.